16/04/2014




News Release: Immediate Release                                                                                                       April 2014

The Colourful Paradise of British Birds

This June, the colourful prints and paintings of Edinburgh based maker Kittie Jones are on display at Concrete Wardrobe for the latest Maker of the Month Exhibition.

Jones’ work is inspired by British nature and our relationship with it. In the last few years printmaking has formed a central part of her practice. Her screen prints depict bold and colourful characterisations of well-known British birds in their natural habitat.

The captured moment with an animal or bird when out ‘in the field’ is Jones’ starting point for a painting or screen-print.
“My work usually starts on location, often with a hot flask and my waterproof trousers, making sketches and drawings of the natural world.”
She enjoys the challenges of printmaking and the limitations it presents. Screen-printing allows her to combine bold saturated colour with softer, hand-drawn marks.

Originally from Cumbria, Jones took a Foundation Course at Leith School of Art, where she now teaches. She went on to complete a combined degree in History of Art and Fine Art (Painting) at Edinburgh College of Art and Edinburgh University. She regularly exhibits work in galleries and open exhibitions throughout the United Kingdom.

As Maker of the Month at Concrete Wardrobe, Jones is presenting new unframed screen prints of British Birds, greetings cards and a new tea towel design. Fiona McIntosh, co-owner of Concrete Wardrobe commented,
“Kittie Jones is passionate about her subject matter, and her colourful style creates an eye-catching visual display. Her pictures are full of life and vibrancy, depicting British birds in a fresh and unexpected way.”

Kittie Jones is on display at Concrete Wardrobe from 1st to 30th June 2014.
Concrete Wardrobe is open Monday to Saturday 11am to 7pm. (Sunday 12 - 5pm.)
Concrete Wardrobe 50a Broughton Street, Edinburgh EH1 3SA

ENDS
PR: Katherine Emtage. Co-Owners: James Donald & Fiona McIntosh.

09/04/2014


News Release: Immediate Release                                                                                                       April 2014

Edinburgh Revisited


This May, Concrete Wardrobe are showcasing the work of Edinburgh based printmaker Jenni Douglas. Douglas uses traditional printmaking techniques to create contemporary prints and gifts for the home.
Her inspiration comes from her home city of Edinburgh. From the old town architecture of skinny tenements and stepped rooftops, to the beauty of parks and gardens, the city continually fascinates, and provides her greatest stimulus.

Douglas is passionate about traditional printmaking techniques. All of her designs start life as a hand drawing, and are then developed into a lino or screen print. The handmade element of craft is important to Douglas. She explains.
“I love the unique marks and textures which hand printing creates, and I want to make pieces which retain a sense of these traditional processes and a hand made feel.”

On display at Concrete Wardrobe this May are a selection of prints, cards, mugs, coasters, bags and tea towels. Of her exhibition at Concrete Wardrobe, Co-owner James Donald enthused.
“Jenni Douglas is a true Edinburgh artist. Having grown up in the city she has a unique perspective and a definitive style. We are very pleased to be hosting her debut exhibition at Concrete Wardrobe.”
The work of Jenni Douglas is on display at Concrete Wardrobe from 1st to 31st May 2014.
Concrete Wardrobe is open Monday to Saturday 11am to 7pm. (Sunday 12 - 5pm.)
Concrete Wardrobe 50a Broughton Street, Edinburgh EH1 3SA

ENDS
PR: Katherine Emtage. Co-Owners: James Donald & Fiona McIntosh.


02/04/2014


QandA with Mike Finnie of Red Houss Shetland

    1.     Who are you and what do you do?
      I’m Mike Finnie and after retiring as an Architect I built myself a very nice red shed where I spend most of my days – I think my bed will be moving in with me soon.
2            What is your main inspiration?
      There are various influences but the main one is the Shetland landscape and the buildings set in it. There are lots of other influences but time seems to have stopped me following these up.
3            Where do you work from?
      
The aforementioned shed. It’s a very posh shed with better heating and better insulation than my house. I designed it with some risky things that I couldn’t do on a clients building. I have a larch roof and stainless steel window sills and the outside is painted in the brightest red that I could find

4             What do you do to relax?
I go to the beach. I have dozens to pick from and some are only a short walk from my house. I have my own stretch of shoreline which I like to call a beach but in reality it’s rock and seaweed.
5            Tell us something surprising about your studio space/education/life experience
I trained as an architect without having much idea what an architect did. I also wanted to be a graphic designer without having much idea what they did either. The studio is letting me play at all the things I might have liked to do.
6           Where did you study?
Duncan of Jordanstone in Dundee. I was the first year to move into the concrete building on Perth Road. It was an amazing space, all hard concrete, black floors and red plastic squishy chairs. I loved the place.
7             What’s the best advice you can give to other makers or have received?
Just go for it and give it a try. You meet so many nice folk too.
8            Where do you see your creative practice going?
I have ideas. I’m off to Sweden in June to study the simple red wooden buildings perched on the rocky coast. I’m hoping something will develop from that. Did I mention that I liked sheds?
9           Who would you like to have over for dinner?
Reza Abedini, Chant Avedissian and Gunnar Asplund.  Swedish fishy starters, Khoresh and a pudding made with pomegranates and rose water.
10       What is the best thing about being an independent maker?
      For me the freedom. Sunny days are special in Shetland and if a brilliant day comes along I can shut up shop and walk along the coast.

19/03/2014


Q&A with Amy Dolan of Ziggy Sawdust

 Who are you and what do you do?
My name is Amy and I am the creator and maker of Ziggy Sawdust furniture.
 What is your main inspiration?  
      Seeing the potential in the furniture of yester-year and saving it from landfill.
      Where do you work from?
      I am very lucky in that I am able to work from my garage at home. There is enough space to work and store furniture and it means that I can literally crawl into bed after working late. It can get a bit chilly, but wearing at least 3 woolly jumpers solves that problem!
      What do you do to relax?
      My friends and family are really important to me and so any spare time I have is spent with them. I have also recently become addicted to watching Breaking Bad (a few years later than the rest of the world!) so that has become quite a time consuming past-time!
     Tell us something surprising about your studio space/education/life experiences.
     I gave an elephant a bath once.

     Where did you study?
     I studied at The Glasgow School of Art. I loved my time there and would do it all again if I could!
     What’s the best advice you can give to other makers or have received?
     You have as many hours in a day as Beyonce. 
     Where do you see your creative practice going?
      I would like to get more involved with interior design and I would also love for Ziggy Sawdust to grow, to teach and encourage others how to 'Ziggy-fy' their furniture. 
     Who would you like to have over for dinner?
     David Bowie. No question about it.
     What is the best thing about being an independent maker?
     Working for yourself and doing what you love. Also being able to liaise directly with your customers and build a personal rapport with them.