22/10/2014

News Release: Immediate Release
October 2014

A Duo of Distinctive Styles in the Mix

This November, Concrete Wardrobe welcomes the return of the popular Edinburgh-based textile designer/makers, PickOne and Tessuti, who will bring their distinctive styles together as joint Maker of the Month.

James Donald of PickOne and Fiona McIntosh of Tessuti will each be exhibiting the latest additions to their growing collections of covetable and highly wearable hand woven and printed textiles, plus distinctive accessories for the home.

Work by Tessuti this November will include silk and cashmere scarves, cashmere ponchos and earthenware cups.  Taking inspiration from the colours and imagery of mid century design, McIntosh creates her textile pieces by hand dying and then silk-screen printing the silk using the ‘discharge’ method, which enables her to create beautiful colour combinations whilst retaining the original soft handle of the fabric. 

PickOne will be showcasing a new range of woven ties and scarves in seasonal, on-trend colour ways.  The collection is hand woven using a mixture of lambswool, linen, dip-dyed silk, and mercerised cotton.  The pieces have double cloth weave structures, designed and manufactured from PickOne’s Leith-based studio, on a 32 shaft computerised loom.  Each piece is woven to a generous length before being hand finished, washed, air dried and partially pressed, to give each item its distinctive look and feel.

Speaking of the upcoming joint exhibition, James Donald commented, “Fiona and I are very excited about showcasing our work together again at Concrete Wardrobe this November.  As co-founders of the shop, the event has a special significance for us.”

Tessuti and PickOne will be on display at Concrete Wardrobe from 1st to 30th November 2014.
Concrete Wardrobe is open Monday to Saturday 11am to 7pm. (Sunday 12 - 5pm.)
Concrete Wardrobe 50a Broughton Street, Edinburgh EH1 3SA

ENDS
PR: Jenni Douglas. Co-Owners: James Donald & Fiona McIntosh.

01/10/2014




News Release:  Immediate Release                                                                                     October 2014

Tweed: A Rich Harvest

This October, Edinburgh-based designer/maker, Katherine Emtage, displays her collection of beautifully crafted and seasonally-toned tweed bags, purses, accessories and homewares as Concrete Wardrobe’s Maker of the Month.

Working in Harris and other Scottish tweeds, Emtage produces design led bags and accessories, which use traditional tweed in new and innovative ways.  With a rich jewel toned palette including olive, poppy, peacock and tangerine, Emtage specialises in quilting, ruching, pin-tucking and colour blocking the tweed, among other techniques, to create interesting and unusual pieces that are contemporary, with a timeless feel.

Amongst her plentiful range on display at Concrete Wardrobe this October are men’s cycling/messenger bags in cool charcoal shades, day bags in rich moss greens and browns, plus coin purses, corsages and iPhone/iPod cases in a stunning range of colours and textures.  Emtage is keen to use natural materials wherever possible; evening bags are lined in silk taffeta and day bags in bespoke hand printed cotton hemp.



Fiona McIntosh, co-owner of Concrete Wardrobe added, “Emtage’s work is a skilful blend of beauty and functionality.  She has a loyal customer base at Concrete Wardrobe who appreciate the quality and craftsmanship of her work and we are very excited to host her newest and most diverse collection this October”.

Katherine Emtage will be on display at Concrete Wardrobe from 1st to 31st October 2014. Concrete Wardrobe is open Monday to Saturday 11am to 7pm. (Sunday 12 - 5pm.)
Concrete Wardrobe 50a Broughton Street, Edinburgh EH1 3SA.
ENDS

PR: Jenni Douglas. Co-Owners: James Donald & Fiona McIntosh

24/09/2014

Q&A with Crimson Textiles



1) Who are you and what do you do?

Lesley Thornton  - designer/maker; seamstress; kilt-maker

2)  What is your main inspiration?

First and foremost I’m a ‘maker’. For me, making is a compulsion, something that I’m driven to do from within. I’m inspired by beautiful fabrics; vibrant colours; the traditional skills of domestic crafters, often unrecognised in their day; mid-century design.

3) Where do you work from?

I work from a purple shed at the bottom of my garden. My studio is full of sewing paraphernalia - it’s like working inside a huge sewing box. It’s south facing, has windows on 2 walls and is flooded with light from morning until night. My husband built it for me 9 years ago from mainly recycled materials and ebay purchases. I’m usually working in it from 9am - 6pm, 5/6 days a week.

4) What do you do to relax?

To relax I keep making, but personal projects and gifts for friends. I’m also going through an on-line Scrabble phase at the moment. 

5) Tell us something surprising about your studio space/education/life experiences.

My handsome grey cat, Arty, sleeps on the ironing board in my studio (when I’m not ironing!) and I do admit that I talk to him quite a lot. 

6) Where did you study?



I studied Textile Design at the Scottish College of Textiles in Galashiels (1980-1984)

7) What's the best advice you can give to other makers or have received?

I’m often asked how I have the self discipline to be self employed. I follow the advice of a visiting lecturer when I was at college, and give myself little rewards throughout the working day as I complete tasks - rewards ranging from 10mins web browsing to the top reward of a half-hour break with coffee and scone in my local tearoom! (But not every day!)

8) Who would you like to have over for dinner?

My best friends - and Yotam Ottolenghi, to do the cooking!

9) What is the best thing about being an independent maker?


Being able to make a living doing what I love most is just the best thing ever. 

16/07/2014


News Release: Immediate Release                                                                                     July 2014

Knots and Spots


This September, the textile accessories of Lesley Thornton’s ‘Crimson’ label are on display at Concrete Wardrobe for the latest Maker of the Month exhibition.

Thornton studied Textile Design at the Scottish College of Textiles in Galashiels and after graduating in 1984, she worked in theatre wardrobe at the Byre Theatre in St. Andrews and the Royal Opera House in London, before returning to Scotland to train in the traditional craft of kiltmaking.  She launched Crimson Textiles in 2005 and in addition to making kilts and working on her own range, Thornton also designs and produces work for other fabric designers.

Drawing upon her experience as a skilled kiltmaker and her passion for working with Scottish fabrics, Thornton designs and creates textile accessories which include neckwear, bags, hats and her statement knotted textile jewellery.  Working from her garden studio in the shadow of the Ochil Hills, Thornton creates pieces which beautifully blend the traditional with the modern in unique and contemporary ways.    

Of her exhibition at Concrete Wardrobe, Thornton commented, “This September at Concrete Wardrobe I'm looking forward to showcasing new products using a mix of my favourite  fabrics - linen, tartan & tweed - with a scattering of polka dots, added to my signature range of knotty tartan jewellery.”



James Donald of Concrete Wardrobe added, “We are delighted to see the return of Crimson Textiles as Maker of the Month this September.  Lesley Thornton’s textile accessories are beautifully crafted, visually striking and highly wearable.  We expect her exhibition to be very popular with locals and visitors alike”.  

Lesley Thornton is on display at Concrete Wardrobe from 1st to 30th September 2014.
Concrete Wardrobe is open Monday to Saturday 11am to 7pm. (Sunday 12 - 5pm.)
Concrete Wardrobe 50a Broughton Street, Edinburgh EH1 3SA.

ENDS

PR: Jenni Douglas. Co-Owners: James Donald & Fiona McIntosh.
Q&A with Charlotte Duffy

1) Who are you and what do you do?

My name is Charlotte Duffy and I make sculpture from recycled cardboard.

2) 
What is your main inspiration?

Blimey there are so many it’s tricky to pin down a main one. Other artists such as Joseph Cornell, Marcel Duchamp and Grayson Perry have been a great inspiration. But it’s usually really very mundane things that inspire me on a daily basis, everyday objects, modern architecture and abandoned objects.

3) Where do you work from?

I work from a little studio in an attic in the village of Auchtermuchty.

4) 
What do you do to relax?

I’m never very relaxed unless I’m making something. So when I need to put the cardboard to the side for a while I like to make music or take photographs. But there’s also nothing quite like putting some records on and having a wee beer after a long day in the studio.

5) 
Tell us something surprising about your studio space/education/life           
experiences.

Well I share my studio with a tortoise called Icarus who was given to me by my parents on the 18th birthday. Also I have a cardboard box tattooed on my arm.

6) 
Where did you study?

I studied Philosophy at the University of St Andrews. Which wasn’t always my cup of tea. But I spent a great deal of time studying the philosophy of art and aesthetics which was really important to my practice today as it made me really consider where the value of art should lie.

7) 
What’s the best advice you can give to other makers or have received?

I think authenticity and honesty is really important. I like to think that everything I make has a great deal of myself in it and that’s all that matters. I don’t particularly care what happens to that piece after that – it being placed in a gallery won’t make it a better piece than if it’s in a shop window. Quite early on I was advised to really work out what part of the process was the most important to me and it wasn’t how it was sold or who it was sold to, but the making of it. And that is the only way I have managed to make cardboard my full time job.

8) 
Where do you see your creative practice going?

My work’s been getting bigger and bigger over the last few months so I would really like to create an entirely cardboard environment to scale one day soon.

9) 
Who would you like to have over for dinner?

Tracey Emin, Tolstoy and the cast of The Good Life. 

10) 
What is the best thing about being an independent maker?

How much hard work it is. I have had a variety of different jobs and none of them have had me collapsing into bed at the end of the day like this do.